dental hygiene (3)

5 Reasons You Should Take Care of Your Teeth

You know you should brush your teeth twice a day and floss regularly, yet many of us neglect our dental hygiene. According to a 2018 poll published in the Journal of the American Dental Association, periodontitis, or gum disease, affects 42 percent of US individuals over 30. However, the consequences of dental problems aren't confined to your teeth and gums.

When someone has periodontal disease, their mouth’s surroundings become less healthy: Gum tissues that are inflamed, irritated, and swollen aren't as strong a barrier to bacteria and toxins as they would be if they were healthy. As a result, illnesses that begin in your mouth may be linked to disorders in other parts of your body.

Continue reading to learn how oral hygiene may help your body's overall health, as well as the indicators of disease that your teeth might indicate.

1. It may improve metabolic syndrome

 The term "metabolic syndrome" refers to a collection of risk factors that raise the risk of heart disease, stroke, and type 2 diabetes. High blood sugar, high blood fats (cholesterol or triglycerides), abdominal obesity, and high blood pressure are examples of these conditions. 

Periodontal disease may be a component of metabolic syndrome, according to certain research. However, further research is needed to substantiate a link between metabolic syndrome and periodontal disease, as the underlying molecular mechanisms that reveal a link have yet to be proven.

2. It can lower the risk of heart attack 

Oral bacteria that enter the bloodstream may be linked to heart issues. Disease-causing oral bacteria can move to other regions of the human body, including the heart, via the circulation, which is why there is a link between dental health and cardiovascular disorders.

Chronic inflammation becomes the "touchpoint" where oral and systemic health are linked, as the body generates an inflammatory response to try to heal. People with untreated periodontal disease are two to four times more likely to suffer from a heart attack.

3. It may reduce the risk of stroke 

The same processes that appear to reduce the risk of heart disease may also reduce the chance of stroke. Gum disease causes germs to enter the circulatory system These bacteria have been detected in the plaques found inside blood vessels, linking them to strokes and heart attacks.

Patients with periodontitis had a higher risk of ischemic stroke and a lower 10-year stroke survival rate than people without periodontitis, according to a study published in the Journal of Clinical Periodontology in 2019. People who get treatment for periodontal disease can actually lower their stroke risk.

4. It may lower your chances of lung disease 

The link between lung disorders, such as pneumonia is clear. Bacteria can be inhaled directly from the lips into the lungs. Bacterial infections, such as pneumonia, might occur as a result of this. Furthermore, when germs from the back of the mouth and upper throat move into the respiratory tract, oral disorders like periodontal disease can exacerbate respiratory infections in those who already have respiratory problems.

5. Lowered effects of high blood glucose  

Dental issues may exacerbate type 2 diabetes, while type 2 diabetes may exacerbate dental issues. According to the National Institutes of Health, uncontrolled diabetes causes high glucose (sugar) levels in saliva, which can foster the growth of bacteria that cause gum disease.

Diabetes patients may also have dry mouth, which increases their risk of cavities, and high glucose encourages the growth of thrush, a fungal infection. A diabetic's blood sugar regulation is improved by having a healthy mouth.

Read more…

Sometimes, even if you follow thorough dental hygiene, you still may be at risk of developing gum disease, a severe gum infection that can potentially damage your jawbone if untreated. If gum disease persists for a long time, it can develop into a more serious periodontal disease. Learning more about its different culprits can help you prevent the onset of this condition and start immediate treatment when necessary. 

Keep on reading to discover some of the causes of gum disease that go beyond dental hygiene. 

1. Genetics
Gum disease can be hereditary. You can be more vulnerable to this mouth bacterial infection due to your family health history. If you suspect you’re genetically predisposed, meticulous dental hygiene should be your main priority. 

2. Aggressive bacteria
Many people get virulent bacteria that are more harmful to their gum lines and jawbones that support their teeth. Such bacteria can result in bleeding gums, jawbone deterioration, and shifting teeth, without you even experiencing a characteristic pain. If you have this kind of gum disease, consult a periodontist ASAP because hygiene alone is inefficient. 

3. Medications
A wide range of medications can trigger swelling or bleeding in your gums. Certain medications can decrease the amount of saliva in your mouth, allowing bacteria to spread quicker. If you’re using liquid medicines, antacids, and cough drops that are laced with sugar, practicing good dental hygiene is even more important.   

4. Smoking
When it comes to your dental health, it’s not just cigarettes that are a problem. Any type of tobacco product, including electronic cigarettes, chewing tobacco, vape, and snus, can increase your risk of developing gum disease by 20% to 30%. Tobacco use hampers the natural tissue healing process in your mouth and makes it more susceptible to bacteria. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, periodontitis (advanced gum disease) is more common in men (57%) than in women (39%) and even more so in those who smoke (65%). 

5. Pregnancy and hormone fluctuations
Expectant mothers and women on their periods should follow thorough dental hygiene. That’s because hormonal changes that occur during these processes can make your gum line more susceptible to oral bacteria. Persistent gum disease in pregnant women can lead to complications like preterm birth and low birth weight. 

6. Malnutrition
If your gums are pouring blood, it can be a sign of gingivitis, an early stage of gum disease. However, bleeding gums can also signal nutritional deficiencies. For example, low levels of vitamin C in the bloodstream are linked to increased gum leading, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Try eating more healthy foods like broccoli, Brussels sprouts, and peppers to resolve this problem. Unhealthy eating, in general, can impact your body’s immune system. 

7. Age
According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, more than 64 million middle-aged Americans are affected by some form of gum disease. Your risk for gum disease and other health problems becomes higher as you age. The risk for periodontitis, the most severe stage of gum disease, increases to nearly 80% in people over 65, reports the American Academy of Periodontology.

8. Overall health issues
Cardiovascular disease, diabetes, and rheumatoid arthritis are the three major systemic diseases that can lead to inflammation and worsen the condition of your gums. According to various studies conducted over the last 30 years, gum disease is commonly linked to an increase in those types of diseases. That’s because mouth bacteria can spread to other parts of your body through small wounds and openings in your gums and other oral tissues. 

Read more…